Knitting Patterns: Colorblock Scarf

I don’t know about you, but it’s cold here–like the kind of cold that makes you question your sanity. “I could go to the store for groceries or I could lie here and slowly die of hunger because starvation is less painful than the windchill.”

Also the thermostat in my office has two settings: Oh, Hey That’s What Menopause Feels Like or Everyone Can See My Nipples.

To fend off the cold, I decided to make myself an extra warm, colorblock scarf.

Things you will need:

3 skeins Rowan Creative Focus worsted weight yarn (I used ebony, natural and magenta). Any worsted weight yarn works.

1 pair of size 10 needles.

A tapestry needle for seaming.

A warm beverage of choice.

a mug with a SBTB flask alongside it.

Maybe you tipple a little something into it, just to keep you warm of course.

Instructions:

1. Look at this picture of Ioan Gruffudd. You’re welcome.

Very fine looking gentleman in a suit and fedora lounging on a bed

2. CO 3 stitches.

3. Kfb in the first stitch, K to end

4. K2tog, K to last stitch, Kfb

WAIT ELYSE! WTF IS THIS WITCHCRAFT? WHAT IS KFB AND K2TOG? Check out these tutorials for KFB and K2TOG.

Repeat steps 3 & 4 till the scarf the size you want.

Shawl in ebony, white, and black

For mine, I did 80 rows in ebony, 5 in natural and 60 in magenta. You could add more rows and make yourself a shawl as well.

magenta and black shawl over a hangar with a pin holding it shut

That’s it! That’s all you need for a woolly, toasty scarf.

Elyse in her shawl

Happy knitting!

 


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  1. 1
    Lynnd says:

    Yay! Another knitting pattern to add to my stash :-).

  2. 2
    Diana says:

    That’s so pretty! I was looking for my next knitting project, and now I’ve found it. Also, your stash of books is making me so jealous.

    And…a friendly reminder to everyone suffering from the cold… The high temp today will be 90 degrees where I live in Florida. I’m heading out to the beach in a few and will think fondly of my freezing sisters in the West and up North. 😉 My next pina colada is for you!

  3. 3
    Lostshadows says:

    @Diana: *glares* Its the first day of spring, and we’re supposed to get 3-6 inches of snow.

  4. 4
    Barb in Maryland says:

    @Lostshadows–I’m joining you in glaring at @Diana…

    Here, south west of Baltimore, we have about an inch of fresh snow, with more falling as I type. The weather gurus assure us that it will turn into rain by the time Spring officially arrives this afternoon.
    So, Elyse, your scarf would have come in handy as I went out to retrieve the morning paper.(Yes, I am one of the three remaining print newspaper readers readers in the state.)

  5. 5
    Lynnd says:

    @Lostshadows – I join in your glaring at @Diana. It doesn’t get much above freezing up here in Southern Ontario this weekend either. I am sooooo sick of this cold weather.

  6. 6
    DonnaMarie says:

    It’s definitely spring. If the annoyingly happy birdsong outside my bedroom window wasn’t enough of a sign, the eau de dead skunk on the side of the road on the way to work this morning certainly was.

    Elyse, I feel your pain. I work with a woman who is perpetually too warm. No matter the season, she is constantly turning the thermostat to freezing my ass off so she’s comfortable. Cause it’s all about the needs of the one.

  7. 7
    GHN says:

    Knitting is fun! (Most of the time. I’m stuggling with the design of a doubleknit lace scarf/wrap, hopefully I’ve got the problems licked now.)

    So it’s spring, it’s warmish and getting warmer. That means it’s time for the lace projects and delicate yarns. Lace knitting may seem difficult at first, but it’s definitely worth learning!

    I suppose the next lesson in knitting from the Bitchery will involve yarnovers – which means you get holes in your knitting! 😉

  8. 8
    tealadytoo says:

    I’m very fond of yarn overs. They coordinate nicely with the holes in my head,

  9. 9
    Diana says:

    No glaring guys! 😉 To get the great weather of Florida… You have to *live* in Florida. Which is basically like living in a Twilight Zone episode, 24/7. No matter how cold it is where you are, you don’t want to be in Florida, no matter how nice the weather is. TRUST ME.

  10. 10
    Elyse says:

    @Diana I will take the cold over the bugs and snakes…

    @GHN the next pattern DOES involve yarn overs! You’re psychic

  11. 11

    >Also the thermostat in my office has two settings: Oh, Hey That’s What Menopause Feels Like or Everyone Can See My Nipples.<

    OMG, I laughed so loudly I scared the cats, otherwise known as my assistants…

  12. 12
    Kate Pearce says:

    Hey I just made a massively thick Outlander cowl on size 50 needles with double yarn and nearly expired from the heat in the five minutes I had to put it on to take pics for the person it is intended for. It’s way too hot for cowls in Hawaii!
    This looks like a good thing to knit for my cold friends.

  13. 13
    Karen Lauterwasser says:

    Just discovered the blog (thanks to Pop Culture Happy Hour). Had no idea that I would find my other favorite thing here – knitting! Thanks for sharing both!

  14. 14
    Coco says:

    @DonnaMarie

    Can I just say, in defense of your coworker, and as a person who is almost always too hot for comfort, it’s way easier for you to put on a sweater. They really frown on us going around naked.

    I mean pack up your stuff and have security escort you out. That sort of frowning.

    Also, I love to crochet but I can’t wear any of the things that I make because it’s too????darn????hot. It makes me sad. Even the lace weight yarn in a wide open stitch is just too hot.
    ????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????

  15. 15
    Coco says:

    Awww, those were cute little flames.

  16. 16
    DonnaMarie says:

    @Coco, I hear you, but I also sit two feet from a 5 x 10 window, in January, in Chicagoland. It’s not just a matter of pulling on a sweater. It’s hard to feel charitable when you nose is frozen solid and you’re typing in gloves.

  17. 17
    denise says:

    lovely scarf

  18. 18
    Coco says:

    @DonnaMarie

    Yeah, I live in Phoenix. We turned the AC on this week.

  19. 19
    DonnaMarie says:

    @Coco, yeah, well, I turned off the heat in my car while I was running errands this morning. So there!

  20. 20
    Coco says:

    @DonnaMarie

    HeHe! That made me laugh like a crazy person. My dog is giving me funny looks now.

  21. 21
    vtknitboy says:

    Hi! Ok, th pattern says repeat til as big as u want. What are the directions for decreasing? Thx

  22. 22
    Coco says:

    @vtknitboy

    I’m a crocheter not a knitter, but if I’m reading this correctly, you’re starting at one end (with the black) and increasing along each row as you go (finishing off with the pink). There’s no decreasing, you would just finish, cast off I think is what you call it, when you get it as wide and as long as you want. You should be increasing in both length and width with each row.

    Unless I have interpreted it entirely wrong. That is always a possibility.

    But if that makes sense maybe you don’t have to wait until tomorrow to hear back from Elyse.

  23. 23
    vtknitboy says:

    Ahh. I was looking at th item from left to rgt. Starting at one of the skinny end point. From that perspective it increases to the midpoint, then decreases to the other skinny end.

  24. 24
    Elyse says:

    @vtknitboy Yup no decreases needed. Just bind off when your happy with the size

  25. 25
    ROSIE says:

    NO DECREASING? A perplexing pattern indeed but they tell me this type of thing is a brilliant ‘workout’ for by aging brain. I keep knitting trusting all will be revealed when I reach the end [ whenever /wherever this may be]. I am hoping that finally I fold the piece to form the pointy ends?

  26. 26
    Coco says:

    @ ROSIE

    I think what’s happening here is that you are knitting a triangle (in this case, in the shape of a pyramid), not from side to side, but from top to bottom. (The black being at the top, narrow point, and the pink being at the bottom, long edge.)

    The stitches at the beginning and end of each row are what skews it (and I’m not sure how those work but apparently they do).

    Then, when your triangle is all skewed and really long, you turn it on its side and wear the black on one end and the pink on the other.

    Does that help?

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