RITA Reader Challenge Review

RITA Reader Challenge: Boomerang Bride by Fiona Lowe

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Title: Boomerang Bride
Author: Fiona Lowe
Publication Info: Carina Press 2011
ISBN: 9781426892004
Genre: Contemporary Romance

Book Cover This review was written by Turophile . This story was nominated in the Best Contemporary Single Title Romance category.

The summary: Matilda Geoffrey risked it all for love. She left Australia to be with Barry—the man who had swept her off her virtual feet. Now, wearing a wedding dress, she's alone on Main Street in small-town Wisconsin, and things aren't working out exactly as planned… In town for his annual family visit, Marc Olsen had never seen a bride quite like Matilda—staring into a storefront window, holding a tottering wedding cake, and looking desperately in need of a groom. He may not have any warm feelings for his hometown,but meeting Matilda just as she discovers she's been scammed by her online “fiancé” stirs something in him. Matilda is not the kind of woman Marc imagined himself with, and Marc is anything but the romantic hero that Matilda has always dreamed of. But as unlikely circumstances throw them together, can they let go of their misconceptions and risk their hearts for love?

And here is Turophile's review:

Oh I loved, loved, loved this book. 

I will confess that I grew up near where this book was set and that may have affected my view.  The oft-mentioned Wausau is a rival town about 45 minutes away from my hometown.  Contemporary romance set in Wisconsin is a rarity.

Setting aside my regional fervor, this book contained all the rights elements for a contemporary romance: humor, an independent heroine who doesn’t roll over for a hot man, and a sexy romance that builds throughout the book.

The book drew me in from the opening sentence: “The petite bride stood stock-still, her chapel-length beaded train sagging in the damp gutter while her white fingers clutched a  a two-tiered wedding cake.” 

Matilda was a pitch-perfect Australian navigating her way through midwestern culture and a crushing romantic blow.  Her dreamy visions of finding and marrying her “grand love” were tempered by a pragmatic, independent, and funny personality.

I loved the fact that the hero was the blonde Nordic type.  So many romantic heroes are tall and dark, but growing up I just wanted a blonde Norwegian boy.  (Okay one disagreement with the book, the blonde Viking types are predominately in Minnesota, not Wisconsin.  And the phrase “It’s been interesting.” So Minnesotan. And since I’m on a rant, what Wisconsin town is bookended with churches?  Generally there’s a bar on every block, sometimes two and esp. in the small towns.)

At times, I did get annoyed by Matilda’s obsession with her grand vision of marrying her “grand love.”  I wanted to shake her and shout, “You’re an independent, talented woman.  Get over it.”  Thankfully she does recognize there’s more to life than her “grand love” dream.  She still finds a pretty special love, but she finds herself and builds up a successful business at the same time.

Funny, well-paced plus a well-done secondary romance. Go read this book.  A-.


This book is available from Goodreads | Amazon | BN | Sony | Kobo | All Romance eBooks.

Comments are Closed

  1. 1
    Sveta says:

    Blond hero? Ooh sounds like my cup of tea :) one of my favorite romance couplings is a brunette heroine and a blond hero.

    http://sveta-randomblog.blogsp…

  2. 2

    Love blonde heroes.  But…  Can I get some clarification?  Did the heroine get engaged to some guy she’d met online and never saw?  And flew all the way—by herself—to the American Mid-West from Australia to marry him?? 

    That just sounds insane.  How naive is this lady?  I mean, live life to the fullest of course, but the guy could have been a serial killer or something for all she knew.

  3. 3
    Lizwadsworth65 says:

    Yes, do clarify, please.  Just from the summary, this woman sounds too dumb to live, something I can’t abide in a protagonist.

  4. 4
    Turophile says:

    I’m drawing a blank, but as I remember he did come see her in Australia.

  5. 5
    Library Addict says:

    I read this last year when it was released. I think my really wanting to like this book affected me more than if I’d read it with lower expectations. From the blurb I expected more of a romantic comedy. But after the mad-cap beginning, the book abruptly shifted to high drama. I didn’t like the hero because he seemed to feel his family was a burden and was too patronizing toward the heroine.

    It took me over a week to read as I kept getting exasperated with the characters or situations and setting it aside. The second half improved with the introduction of a secondary romance. But sadly most of it takes place off-page.

    Much of the humor just missed the boat with me, too. It was my first book by this author. But despite my numerous issues with it, I would probably try her again.

  6. 6
    Sandra says:

    Is it just me, or does she need to get her upper lip waxed?

  7. 7
    BellaBetty says:

    Also a Meh vote here. I didn’t think she was “pitch-perfect Australian”- she seemed more American stereo-type of Australians, starting with her name. I’m American born, but my mum was Australian, we got Woman’s Weekly sent over and hunted down Marmite and Violet Crumble. I think I might enjoyed it more if Matilda wasn’t from Oz, she did seem like a ditz.

  8. 8
    Library Addict says:

    I thought the author is an Australian.

  9. 9
    ToppysMom says:

    ROTFLOL! No, it’s not just you.

  10. 10
    Bnbsrose says:

    I thought it was the crappy resolution on my desktop! That definitely looks like Tom Selleck’s upper lip.

  11. 11
    Ellielu says:

    My dad’s family is Norwegian, with lots of blonds, and from Wittenberg, WI—just down the road from Wausau. So, they do exist in Wisconsin. My dad was blond—although he’s only 5’6”—so not much on the Viking meter. But he was very pretty back in the day. Although, he is half-Swedish too—but we don’t talk about that in polite company. ;-)

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