Help A Bitch Out

HaBO: Fudge

Katy writes:

I read it in about 1988. It was most likely a Harlequin or Harlequin
Presents because that is what my local library stocked.

Scant details. A young woman is pregnant, the older brother of the
“boyfriend” takes responsibility and marries the young lady. Older brother
is a wealthy executive/entrepreneur, something like that. She knows that he
doesn’t love her, but knows that she is better off being married than not,
when she is expecting a baby.

The scene which stuck with me is that she has a craving for fudge one night.
He goes off and returns with fresh fudge. In the morning she thanks the
housekeeper who informs her that her husband made the fudge and dirtied
every pot in the kitchen. She begins referring to her fetus as Fudge.

When she miscarries, she checks herself out of the hospital and disappears.
Husband finally tracks her down and you can guess the rest.

I’ve looked for lists of books from 1988 or 1987, and had no luck so far.
If anyone remembers this book/title/author, I’d be grateful.

Ok, I’m so sure someone will know this one, but, um, this gave me a major case of the squicks. “Fudge?”

 

Categorized:

Help a Bitch Out

Comments are Closed

  1. 1
    willaful says:

    Aw, I think it sounds adorable. I wanna know what it is.

  2. 2
    Natasha R says:

    I wanna know what it is too. You had me at “housekeeper who informs her that her husband made the fudge and dirtied
    every pot in the kitchen” :D

  3. 3
    Jim says:

    Actually, I can’t guess the rest.  What happens?

  4. 4
    Anony Miss says:

    Is this the prequel to “Superfudge”? Cause, whoop, there went my whole childhood, right there.

  5. 5
    Vi says:

    I want to read this one too. I think “Fudge” is a cute nickname.

  6. 6
    Ros says:

    What’s squicky about fudge?  Am I missing some transatlantic connotations?

  7. 7
    Tara says:

    It couldn’t possibly be “Promise Me Tomorrow” by Leigh Michaels, could it?

  8. 8
    Carin says:

    “What’s squicky about fudge?”  Didn’t you ever say this childhood rhyme?  (it was hilarious when I was 5)

    Milk, milk, lemonade,
    This is where the fudge is made!

    (I’ll let you guess the body parts you point to for each food/drink word.)

  9. 9
    Jennifer says:

    Have you tried the database search at http://www.vintageromances.com/

    You scroll down, and on the bottom rightside part of the page, you enter in what you can of the categories you do know and it will match them. It has all the harlequin romance and presents titles. You’d need to figure out the number range of books from the late 80s in order for it to be the most helpful.

    I successfully found a few books I read back then using this site. It also has the benefit of being hilarious!

  10. 10
    Kristin says:

    OMGosh, I had never heard that rhyme.  I MUST banish it from my mind.  I love fudge too much to think about it that way.

  11. 11
    CourtneyLee says:

    I think this book sounds adorable, too. I’m all for unconventional declarations of affection. Midnight fudgemaking in a supposed marraige of convenience definitely counts.

    (and that rhyme kind of traumatized me, so thanks, Carin. lol)

  12. 12
    Madd says:

    Promise Me Tomorrow has to be it.

  13. 13
    FD says:

    I was sat metaphorically scritching my head as well. 
    I’d never heard that rhyme before, and I’m not sure I wanted to either.

    Sounds like a cute book.

  14. 14
    Rebecca says:

    I agree the making fudge is cute, and I could see naming the fetus Fudge (lots of fetuses end up with weird pre-names).  But the leaving every pot in the kitchen dirty for someone else to clean up…ewww.  If this is to prove that he’s really a sweet guy capable of stepping outside of gender roles, why can’t he clean up his own mess?  If you’re competent enough to make edible fudge at 3 am, you’re smart enough to scrub the dishes afterward.  The blithe “oh, the servants will take care of that” bugs me.  To paraphrase Soujourner Truth, “ain’t the housekeeper a woman?”  Is the housekeeper less of a woman than the heroine because she’s not young and beautiful?  Or because she WORKS for a living as opposed to marrying a rich guy she doesn’t love so he can take care of her?  Major squick there, for me.  (Also minor squick that the hero marries his brother’s ex-girlfriend.  That’s a bit weird.)  And unless this is a historical, I don’t see how “oh noes, I must be married and have a man to care for me and my baby [or I could end up like the housekeeper cleaning out other people’s fudge pots]” works.  Not in the late 1980s, at least in the US.

    Spamword: Thinking84: As in “I was thinking that in 1984 single parenthood was already pretty normal.”

  15. 15
    Marianne McA says:

    @Jennifer – that’s a useful site. I’d compltely forgotten about Amanda Carpenter until I saw her listed there. She was good: I wonder what happened to her…

  16. 16
    ashley says:

    omg carin trhat’s gross lol so something that a bunch of wierd little gradeschoolers would sing

  17. 17
    Bridget says:

    The Amazon description for Promise Me Tomorrow doesn’t sound too promising:

    Five years before, Reid Cavanaugh had rescued Cassidy from a bad situation—and made it worse. So rising reporter Cassidy Adams doesn’t want to go after the tycoon’s story and once more enter his life. But the choice isn’t up to her.

    Unless there is a big gap between when she miscarries and when he finds her? I hope someone can tell us, I’m curious now!

  18. 18
    Tara says:

    I know it doesn’t, but go to the Google Books page for Promise Me Tomorrow (it’s at http://books.google.com/books?id=hub4NQKp1OwC ) and search for “dried fudge”.

    I’ve never read the book—I found it using Google Fu this morning when I needed a mental exercise break from work—but snippet searches seem to indicate a match.

    If it’s not, then there are two romances with dried fudge plot points, which is AWESOME.

  19. 19
    sweetsiouxsie says:

    I heard that little poem from another kid at school. I was about 9 at the time. My mother always told us that we were such sweet, innocent little kids until we started associating with other kids in school. LOL ;oP
    I have no idea about the Fudge book. I am still waiting for someone to identify that book with the pot roast in it. Now that would be worth reading! :D

  20. 20
    Brianna says:

    I remember hearing that poem when I was in Infants School (kindergarten to year 2), but ours was slightly different and had a few more lines…

    Milk, Milk,
    Lemonade,
    ‘Round the corner, Chocolate’s made.
    If it’s sticky,
    Pull the dicky,
    Out will come a chocolate bicky!

    NB: bicky = biscuit in the Australian sense, ie cookie.

  21. 21
    TaraL says:

    I know it doesn’t, but go to the Google Books page for Promise Me Tomorrow (it’s at http://books.google.com/books?id=hub4NQKp1OwC ) and search for “dried fudge”.

    If you just search on “fudge” it sounds even more like the book she describes. If you search on “hospital” you get a bit about her losing the baby. We may have a winnah…

  22. 22
    Bridget says:

    Does the original boyfriend die and that’s why his brother marries the heroine? Because snippet searches seem to indicate that that is what happens.

  23. 23
    Susan says:

    Does this sound sort of biblical to anybody?  As in, Old Testament requirement for man to marry his brother’s widow?  Of course, another part of the OT forbids it…not that I’m a biblical scholar.

    Just goes to show, it’s hard to come up with a really new plot.

  24. 24
    Kilian Metcalf says:

    Karin wrote:

    Milk, milk, lemonade,
    This is where the fudge is made!

    In early 1950’s I learned the third line as

    “Around the corner, fudge is made.”

    Interesting that children as young as three could grasp the meaning of the passive voice.  We pick up language quickly, don’t we?

    days38 – it would take me longer than 38 days, maybe 38 months, to begin to understand the passive voice in another language.

  25. 25
    Kilian Metcalf says:

    Karin wrote:

    Milk, milk, lemonade,
    This is where the fudge is made!

    In early 1950’s I learned the third line as

    “Around the corner, fudge is made.”

    Interesting that children as young as three could grasp the meaning of the passive voice.  We pick up language quickly, don’t we?

    days38 – it would take me longer than 38 days, maybe 38 months, to begin to understand the passive voice in another language.

  26. 26
    Jules says:

    My great-grandfather married his brother’s widow…and thus my grandmother was born, both cousin and sister to her older siblings.  It was considered customary.  They were Cuban.

  27. 27

    Wow! That’s a wonderful story and nobody knows what happen next.

  28. 28
    Diane/Anonym2857 says:

    Hmn… I vaguely remember a book like that… possibly the Michaels book (haven’t read it in forever).  I want to say it started a trend where every kid was nicknamed after the cravings she had while carrying them.  Had another child named Muffin, for example.

    Hmn.  I’m looking forward to confirmation on this title.  I want to dig it up and find out.

    Diane :o)

  29. 29
    Ros says:

    Okay, now I am officially squicked.  Thanks, everyone.  And no, I’ve never heard any of the variants of that rhyme before.

  30. 30
    AgTigress says:

    I am horrified by all those ghastly little rhymes featuring fudge.  I am happy to say that I had never heard any of them—but then, sweets were practically unobtainable when I was a small child, and anyway, I didn’t speak English at the time.

    I don’t see why anyone needs to dirty a lot of pots and pans while making fudge: ONE pan, one wooden spoon, a sugar-thermometer if you must, and a jug to measure the milk, if you are not confident enough to guess it.  Oh, and a knife if you need to cut the necessary amount of butter off the half-pound / 250 g. block.  The pan(s) you put the fudge in to set won’t need washing till the fudge has been eaten.  Admittedly, that might not be very long.  But in any case, it comes to fewer utensils than you need for making a cake, for example.

    I think I’ll go and make some vanilla fudge now.

Comments are closed.

↑ Back to Top