Help A Bitch Out

HaBO: Medical Romances

Reader Kelly writes:

I’m desperately looking for some good doctor/medical romances! (And this probably has nothing whatsoever to do with Karl Urban as Dr. McCoy in Star Trek…no, nothing at all…)

Recently AAR was updating their incredibly awesome and so useful lists page with a doctor/nurse/medical category – or I thought they were and maybe I dreamed the whole thing because the listing isn’t there now. If I didn’t dream it, I’m sure that list will be hella useful for Kelly, but in the meantime, what do you suggest?

 

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  1. 1
    Carin says:

    Houston We Have a Problem, by Erin McCarthy is one I enjoyed.  It’s a laugh out loud, yet still steamy romance.

  2. 2
    Elizabeth Wadsworth says:

    I suggest that the reader hit a good used book store.  There are a FREAKING TON of medical romances from the Fifties and Sixties available, enough to form their own sub-genre.  (I can recall visiting an aunt in the 1970’s whose attic was literally stuffed with medical category romances, most of which had “Nurse” in the title.

  3. 3
    Cat Marsters says:

    Harlequin has its own line of them: http://www.millsandboon.co.uk/books/medical.htm  If y.ou can get over the titles, that is.

  4. 4
    jmc says:

    Olivia Gates has written some good medical romances for Harlequin/Mills&Boon;.

    And Betty Neels was the Queen of the Medical Romance back in the day. She’s not to everyone’s taste though.

  5. 5
    Michelle says:

    It is more of a fantasy romance, but Mercedes Lackey’s The Serpent’s Shadow is excellent.  Heroine is a physician in a Victorian type setting (magic abounds).  It is part of her Elemental series, a retelling of a Snow White type story.

  6. 6

    I second Cat’s recommendation to check out Harlequin’s medical romance line.  Some fab authors and variety:  warm, community based vs sheikhs and royalty vs pacy emergency/rescue.  You can buy at the eHarlequin store http://tinyurl.com/le2v5k or as eBooks http://tinyurl.com/nrwudw

    Bron

  7. 7
    Cora says:

    I’m thirding the recommendation for Harlequin/Mills & Boon Medical romances. There are some good books in that line, in spite of the usual awful category romance titles. Two recent ones I have enjoyed are A Family for his Tiny Twins by Josie Metcalfe and Dr Velascos’ Unexpected Baby by Dianne Drake.

    If you like SF, the Stardoc series by S.L. Viehl may be just the thing.

  8. 8
    Mary says:

    I agree with the Harlequin/Mills & Boon medical line. I haven’t read many, but Dianne Drake has written a couple dozen of them. I recently discovered her, and enjoy her tremendously. She’s predominantly sold in Europe though, so some of hers are hard to get. I do agree though that the titles are awful, and not really indicative of the plot. Go by the blurb on the back and ignore the titles completely.

  9. 9
    Amy Andrews says:

    HI,
    I’m one of the authors that write for Harlequin’s medical line and just wanted to pop in and say – we’re out there, we’re great and they’re are six of us each month. They can be bought on shelf in Oz,  and UK and they love us in France. WE’re only online in the U.S. from e-harlequin and unfortunately they only release 4 out of the 6 each month.

    Medicals have such an amazing variety of settings and characters as well as the tried and true and immensely popular doctor/nurse. They also have a huge variance in sensuality levels. From down and dirty steamy ( thats me :-) to sweet and lovely.
    Trust me there is something for everyone in a medical. Best thing about them is the twist on the Alpha hero. He’s the top of his field and highly respected but has a great bedside manner. And the heroine is his equal. No hand-maidens happening in modern medicals!
    Really – go try one. They’re great!! 
    Advertisement over :-)

  10. 10
    Fiona Lowe says:

    HI,
    I’m Fiona Lowe, an Aussie and a Harlequin Mills and Boon Medical Romance Author. Think ER, House, Grey’s Anatomy. What I love about the line is the diversity. Also how the H & H can be at the top of their game professionally but emotionally they’re really struggling. Don’t get fixed on the medical aspect…these books are first and foremost romances and the medical stuff propels the story forward, raising the stakes for the H&H’s conflict.  My books tend to be set in the outback where the progtagonists have to battle not only the challenges of working in isolated places but battle the inconvenient reality that falling in love is the worst thing that could happen to them.
    Like all contemporary romances our heroine’s kick butt and are often the ones ‘saving’ the hero and to that end I really urge you to read the most recently published books rather than seeking out 1960s stories which reflect a lifetime long past.
    Pick up one of our books at eharleuqin…I think you might be glad you did :-)
    Thanks to SM for the post topic!
    Cheers
    Fiona Lowe
    http://www.fionalowe.com

  11. 11
    Fiona Lowe says:

    HI,
    I’m Fiona Lowe, an Aussie and a Harlequin Mills and Boon Medical Romance Author. Think ER, House, Grey’s Anatomy. What I love about the line is the diversity. Also how the H & H can be at the top of their game professionally but emotionally they’re really struggling. Don’t get fixed on the medical aspect…these books are first and foremost romances and the medical stuff propels the story forward, raising the stakes for the H&H’s conflict.  My books tend to be set in the outback where the progtagonists have to battle not only the challenges of working in isolated places but battle the inconvenient reality that falling in love is the worst thing that could happen to them.
    Like all contemporary romances our heroine’s kick butt and are often the ones ‘saving’ the hero and to that end I really urge you to read the most recently published books rather than seeking out 1960s stories which reflect a lifetime long past.
    Pick up one of our books at eharleuqin…I think you might be glad you did :-)
    Thanks to SM for the post topic!
    Cheers
    Fiona Lowe

  12. 12

    Chiming in as one of the US Medical Romance authors here. As both Amy and Fiona stated, we do exist contrary to popular belief!  In fact, many years at the RITAs we have a nominated book by one of our talented authors.  This year it was Lilillian Darcy, a couple years back it was Marion Lennox.
    Agreed, we have the category titles, but I like to think or our books as big stories in little packages.  Though they all take place in a medical setting, and both the hero and heroine must be medical professionals, they are above all else relationship stories.  We have a small but loyal following, and would love to introduce more readers to our fantastic line!
    Thanks SBs for putting the topic out there.
    It’s definitely a new era for medical romance at Harlequin!

  13. 13
    Laura Iding says:

    Another medical romance author here, chiming in that we do exist. There are four books on the eHarlequin website every month available in the US. If you buy lots of books you get free shipping. :)  So if you are in the mood for a doctor/nurse romance or doctor/doctor romance. Or even paramedic/doctor romance give them a try.

  14. 14

    Reader Kelly might wanna check out Heartbeat RWA-it’s one of the online chapters for RWA, and it’s for those who write medical romances.  They have a page up for current releases, and it also lists their members, so you can check out their pages, see if they have more medical romances available.

  15. 15
    Molly Evans says:

    Hi everyone,
    Thanks for picking up the topic of medicals.  We sure do appreciate it.  The medicals that are out now are much more current, and reflect the state of women and relationships now, than the ones written in the fifties and sixties, so for a fresh outlook, pick up the ones that are current. 
    http://www.eharlequin.com has a blog for the medical authors and we also have our own blog at: http://medicalromance.blogspot.com/  So you can come chat with us there.  We love hearing from readers and other writers.
    Incidentally, shipping from the UK to the US is only $4, no matter how many books you get, so if there are books you want, you can get ‘em!
    Molly Evans
    The Drama of Medicine.  The Passion of Romance.
    The Greek Doctor’s Proposal

  16. 16
    Camilla says:

    The Harlequin Medicals by Sarah Morgan (who also writes Presents and is/was a nurse) are some of the best contempoaries I have read. Hard to find tho.

  17. 17
    Deb Kinnard says:

    Kathleen Korbel, whom I heart like anything, wrote a superb story a couple of years back, called SOME MEN’S DREAMS (I think that was the title). It lives with me still—it was that good. Well worth hunting down online or in your local Used Book Paradise.

  18. 18
    Kristy Price says:

    I second the Sarah Morgan recommendation. Her books are fabulous. The characters are realistic and the dialogue is snappy and engaging. I auto-buy her books, they’re that good.

  19. 19
    LizA says:

    I really enjoyed Alina Adam’s When a Man Loves a Woman. The hero and the heroine are doctors, so I think it qualifies…

    spamword: single27 -yep I am single but not 27 by a long shot!

  20. 20
    DS says:

    Darn, I had this all typed out and then one of the dog stepped on the surge protector.

    Anyway, I was suggesting Eileen Dreyer (AKA Katherine Korbel) medical mysteries because they felt authentic, had good humorous bits and seemed true to the nurses I know.  While they are mysteries/suspense first, they had romances included.

    Also in the mid 90’s Elizabeth Neff Walker (Laura Matthews to trad. Regency fans) did four novels set in a hospital that I remember liking pretty well:  Fever Pitch,  Healing Touch, Heart Conditions and Best Medicine.  Oop but available online for shipping and pennies.

  21. 21
    Kathleen says:

    In case anyone’s interested in historical medical romance: Stolen Hearts, by Melinda McRae.

    The hero is a surgeon, and if I remember correctly, the heroine helps run the clinic with her aunt’s charitable organization. I really liked it. I felt like I learned a lot about 19th century medical practice, which was very interesting.

  22. 22
    CourtneyLee says:

    I read a medical HQ Presents years ago that I loved, but I can’t remember it’s title or author. I was going to send a HaBO request to SB Sarah, but maybe this would be a good place to ask…

    The doctor was Italian, named (I think) Carlo and was an obstetrician. He had a fertility clinic in Milan, but was in the UK for a reason I’ve forgotten, but I think it involved him being followed/in danger. His heroine was either an OB nurse or a midwife, I can’t remember. Probably midwife because she deliver’s Carlo’s SIL’s baby at some point. They meet when he’s out walking on a snowy night and she’s on her way to see a pregnant woman whose husband has this irrational fear of doctors and won’t allow his wife near one. Sparks fly and they even kiss before exchanging words. I htink it was luuuurve at first sight for him.

    I remember thinking that the story was adorable aside from the ending where he assumes she’ll move to Italy for him and she basically says “of course!” with barely any consideration.   

    faith78: I have faith that with the combined power of medical romance authors (hi!) and the Bitchery, there’s at least a 78% chance someone knows what book I’m talking about.

  23. 23
    Julie says:

    The Pride of Patrick MacNeill by Virginia Kantra.  I think this qualifies as a medical romance: heroine works is a physician in the burn unit and treats the hero’s son.  It’s a category romance from around 2000.

  24. 24
    Camilla says:

    Courtney Lee It was by Sarah Morgan, titled Italian’s Passionate Proposal. Also wrote one about he heroes brother and his wife (who appeared in the end of this one) called Italian Doctor’s Wife.

  25. 25
    daffiney says:

    If you can commit to a longer historical, I highly recommend The Winter Rose, by Jennifer Donnelly. It’s about a female doctor in Victorian England who works with the poor. It was just what I needed: a really compelling story with a surprisingly sweet romance.

  26. 26
    Molly Evans says:

    within medical romances you get a wide variety of settings and sensuality levels.  That’s one good reason to write/read them, because there’s something for everyone. 
    Thanks
    Molly

  27. 27

    Hi everyone
    I’m another Mills and Boon Medical Romance author popping in to add my thoughts – just a little late!  :)  It’s so great to hear people are enjoying the Medical Romance line – though it’s a shame you’re having trouble getting them.

    There’s a fabulous free e-book for all you Sarah Morgan fans available on eHarlequin now.  It’s a recent addition to the 60th Anniversary celebrations. You can download all 17 free books but make sure you scroll to the very bottom for Sarah’s book, The Rebel Doctor’s Bride.  Here’s the link—
    http://www.eharlequin.com/store.html?cid=1317

    And we’re on Facebook now too. We post the covers for our new books each month so if you’ve got a Facebook profile you might like to join the Fans list and we’ll send you regular updates.
    http://www.facebook.com/pages/Harlequin-Mills-Boon-Medical-Romance-Authors/73397880066

    Happy reading
    Sharon

    PS Courtney Lee, I wish I could help with the title of that book you described!  It sounds like a fun read!

  28. 28
    CourtneyLee says:

    Camilla, you are my hero! Thanks ever so much. After some enthusiatic serching, I have found both books at AbeBooks.com. Yay!

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