Dear Bitches, Smart Authors Podcast: Romantic Tropes, Carolyn Jewel, and Female Empowerment

Welcome to another podcast Tuesday. It’s not every Tuesday, but every other Tuesday, but regardless, grab your nearest audio device and give a listen: it’s podcast time!

Jane and I discuss our favorite romance tropes, from the friends-to-lovers to the makeover plot, and all the tropes in between that we cannot resist. Then Carolyn Jewel is with us to talk about female empowerment, or the lack thereof, in historical times, and how the true history of the political, economic, and social status of women can make for some painfully fascinating characters.

Mp3 is available for download as well. PLEASE for the love of God right click and save, k? Esosoft and I will thank you.

You can subscribe to our feed at Feedburner or at iTunes If you have content suggestions, tips on how to do this whole thing better, or general wtf-ery comments, email us. It’s all welcome because a) we are new to this and b) we don’t really know what we are doing so the wtf comments are probably all valid. The email address for the podcast is sbjpodcast@gmail.com.

This podcast is brought to you by the letters E, J, and S, and by Morgan from Miss Media Productions. Thanks, Morgan!

Categorized:

General Bitching...

Comments are Closed

  1. 1
    Molly says:

    In case you haven’t seen the TV Tropes site can be amusing:

    http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/LoveTropes

  2. 2
    rebyj says:

    It’s times like these that I wish I had more education. Tropes is a word I’ve never heard before LOL.

    Changes in historical novels. Very good discussion. Carolyn Jewel was a great guest.

    Sarah close your eyes….

    HEY readers! Reply more so they know we appreciate the podcast series! I don’t want them to stop.

  3. 3
    SonomaLass says:

    Yay, Carolyn!  Yay, SB Sarah and Jane!  What a great conversation.  I love trope discussions; friends to lovers and second chance lovers are two of my favorites. (So yeah, I totally loved Scandal.)  I’m really drawn in by the “getting to know someone better before you fall in love” approach to romance; while it flies in the face of the traditional “love at first (smoldering) glance,” it also feels more real to me.  Of course, a good writer can make almost anything work for me.

    How historical novels deal with the more restrictive gender roles of their period settings fascinates me.  In Scandal, I thought the heroine earning money from writing was a nice dimension to the story.  It gave her an extra option, which makes her ultimate choice more meaningful, and it also worked really well as a device for revealing more about both of the main characters.  The scenes where they talked about her writing were some of my favorites.

    See, now, you’ve got me thinking about literature when I should be grading student essays.  I’ve learned the hard way that thinking about good writing makes reading student writing much more difficult.

Comments are closed.

↑ Back to Top