Shabbat Shalom, And Pass the Plaid

In a funny intersection of my fascination with all things Scottish and the fact that I’m a righteous Hebe, check this article out: the first Scottish-born Rabbi in Scotland has commissioned and been granted approval for a tartan for the approximately 7,000 Scottish Jews. Rabbi Jacobs, who is the leader of a Lubavitch congregation in Glasgow, traveled the Highlands to research the tartan, which is blue, white, gold and red, and pretty damn spiffy if you ask me.

At the official website for the tartan, Jewish Tartan, you can get trews and kippahs made from the fabric, which just cracks me up for some reason. Check out a sample of the fabric, which is sewn in a pattern of threes and sevens, three for the members of a Bet Din (the Jewish Rabbinical Court) and seven, which is a number representing wholeness: Jewish brides circle their grooms seven times before the beginning of a wedding ceremony, during which is said the sheva berachot, the Seven Blessings.

So there’s your mini Hebrew school lesson of the day, folks, and congrats to Rabbi Jacobs for a righteous tartan, which proves, definitively, if it’s not Scottish & Jewish, it’s chhhhhhhhraaaap!

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  1. 1
    Barb Ferrer says:

    They’re not just Jews, they’re hard core, man.  Lubavitchers in Scotland? Dang. 

    *is mightily impressed*

  2. 2

    well, whatta ya know…

    This Jew has no ties to Scotland…still, it’s pretty damn cool!!  Mazel Tov!

  3. 3
    SB Sarah says:

    Seriously, Hebrew with a Scottish accent? WANT TO HEAR SO BAD OMG.

  4. 4
  5. 5
    Silver James says:

    Love the tartan!

    Seriously, Hebrew with a Scottish accent? WANT TO HEAR SO BAD OMG.

    And that so makes me want to write a highlander romance with a Jewish protagonist, SB Sarah! L’chei-im!

    (argh! I am such a nebbish coder – she says multiple edits later…)

  6. 6
    SB Sarah says:

    Ach and Oy, baby!

  7. 7
    Esri Rose says:

    YESSSSSSSSS!!

    “Och, oy, toss the caber already.”

  8. 8
    Zoe Archer says:

    Love the blue and white shout out to Israel in the pattern.  I’m majorly kvelling over here as a M.O.T. (Member of the Tribe)

    Seriously, Hebrew with a Scottish accent? WANT TO HEAR SO BAD OMG.

    Please, please find a sound clip of this.  I’m so used to hearing Hebrew with a New Yawk accent, thanks to my family, but I must hear the Hebrew burr.

  9. 9
    Esri Rose says:

    D’oh, Sarah! You beat me to the “Och oy!” by moments!

  10. 10
    moom says:

    It does apparently come through very strong, my mother treats an elderly Jewish lady whose nephew is Glaswegian and well, the Glaswegian accent’s pretty strong anyway so one can only wonder how anyone actually undestands what he’s saying when he speaks Hebrew.

  11. 11

    I must hear the Hebrew burr

    Hmm, I have an idea.  Let’s get Gerry Butler (Scottish actor of 300, Phantom of the Opera, etc. fame) to say the Kiddish!  YUMMY!!!

  12. 12
    Barb Ferrer says:

    I’m so used to hearing Hebrew with a New Yawk accent, thanks to my family, but I must hear the Hebrew burr.

    My husband’s family is all from the south.  Shabbat shalom, y’all.

    I like Leslie’s idea.  Gerry Butler works for pretty much anything, although James McAvoy would make a right lovely stand in as well.

  13. 13
    shuzluva says:

    I must get the hubster and the little handsome pants matching kipot! OOH! It will be adorable and scrumptios at the same time. Sarah, you’ve made my day. Shabbat Shalom sweety!

    Hmm, I have an idea.  Let’s get Gerry Butler (Scottish actor of 300, Phantom of the Opera, etc. fame) to say the Kiddish!

    *dies*

  14. 14
    Zoe Archer says:

    I like Leslie’s idea.  Gerry Butler works for pretty much anything, although James McAvoy would make a right lovely stand in as well.

    While we’re at it, let’s throw in an Irishman or two.  I want to hear Liam Neeson sing Daiyanu.

  15. 15
    Zoe Archer says:

    I like Leslie’s idea.  Gerry Butler works for pretty much anything, although James McAvoy would make a right lovely stand in as well.

    While we’re at it, let’s throw in an Irishman or two.  I want to hear Liam Neeson sing Daiyanu.

  16. 16
    sassenach says:

    Somewhat on-topic, I recently found a book by Ronald Hutton called “Witches, Druids, and King Arthur,” in which he documents the history of the kilt and “clan tartans” (see pp 4 and 5). Interestingly, they are not a Scottish item of dress from ancient times, but a “tradition” started by non-Scots in the late 18th and early 19th centuries, and adopted as part of the national identity in a Celtic revival movement.

    The book deals mainly with how myths are made, which is a fascinating subject, and uses the tartan/kilt history to illustrate how things sometimes get cobbled together and are projected backwards in time. Definitely on my to-be-read list!

  17. 17
    jessica says:

    This MOB is also kvelling (delighted). I want to get some kippot for my dad and brother and anyone else I know. Must find clip of the rabbi speaking hebrew with a Scottish accent. Dying to hear what it sounds like. Gerry Butler, and some Irish guys sound yummy too.

  18. 18
    ev says:

    Let’s get Gerry Butler (Scottish actor of 300, Phantom of the Opera, etc. fame) to say the Kiddish!  YUMMY!!!

    Only if he wears it the proper way.

    And there is a really, really big breeze blowing.

    done67

  19. 19
    ev says:

    Now I just have to figure out how to work this tartan into our conglomerate of a family- I am the one of Scottish descent and my step son is married to a nice Jewish girl from Long Island. maybe I should get something for my twin grandsons.

    this could be fun.

  20. 20
    AgTigress says:

    I recently found a book by Ronald Hutton called “Witches, Druids, and King Arthur

    Just a small word of warning on Hutton:  he is a respected (though rather flamboyant) history professor, and is undoubtedly an accepted authority on certain periods of modern history, but he has been fairly seriously challenged on some of his interpretations of archaeological material. 

    I have not read any of his books, and even a novice first-year archaeology student knows that modern ‘Druidism’ is a very recent romantic invention (there is no objective archaeological evidence for Druids at all, and the written documentary evidence is all, naturally, from outside the culture, i.e. Latin, not British) so on the whole I am probably on Hutton’s side.  Certainly Welsh ‘national costume’ is a blatantly 19th century invention, and this is very well documented.  It is just that I am not quite sure how confident one can be about Hutton’s complete understanding of anything prehistoric (or early medieval/dark age, which amounts to much the same thing – the 5th-6th centuries AD in Britain are no less obscure than the 3rd-2nd BC).  Historians always assume that they understand archaeological evidence without formal training, but they are mistaken.

    ;-)

  21. 21

    We used to have some Scottish Jews in our congregation, and still have some Brits who went to St. Andrews for schooling.  If you come to our Shabbat service on Saturday morning, there’s a single malt alternative to the sweet wine during kiddush, though occasionally our good ol’ boys sneak in a bourbon instead.

  22. 22
    ev says:

    Darlene- can I come visit???

  23. 23

    ev, you absolutely can come to visit. We love visitors. Just remember, you have to sit through 2.5 to 3 hours of mostly-in-Hebrew praying to get the drink at the end.

    Kind of a carrot and stick approach to religion.[g]

  24. 24

    Okay, I may be the only one here who was an honorary member of the Loyal League of the Yiddish Sons of Ireland.
    I’m a MOB from Brooklyn. And also a devoted lover of Ireland and Israel and all things Celtic. Besides writing romances with a decided Irish slant and also, finally writing erotic romance stories with Jewish characters, I also am a professional singer.
    Years ago, I performed for the group for their annual Colleen Queen Esther banquets. Since often enough Purim and St. Patrick’s Day come close together, they would hold a competition to select a Queen who had to have at least one parent or grandparent born in either Ireland or (to widen the pool) Scotland.
    I was lucky enough to meet Stiller and Meara (parents of Ben Stiller) over 37 years ago at a . When they learned I was a member, they asked me to get them in contact with the Loyal League’s president. After all, Stiller (Jewish) and Meara (Irish) sort of fit the bill!
    They used to entertain for years at these functions.
    Fun posting today!

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