I can has pictures? You can has pictures!

I have finally been reunited with my full size keyboard and laptop and I have uploaded the photos I snapped at RT. Alas, I was sporting the little camera, which doesn’t take the really hot photos, so some are grainy due to poor lighting or bad flash. I will endeavor to bring a more beefy and appropriate camera in future efforts, because DAMN was there a lot to photograph.

Behold, the gallery of photos. Enjoy.

Categorized:

Romantic Times

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  1. 1
    Wryhag says:

    Those photos, they were one big batch of HOLY SHIT! 

    Could someone please ‘splain to me what the Faerie Ball business is all about?  I don’t quite get it.  Rent wigs and wings, throw on some glitter, then . . . what?  Give people quarters for their missing teeth?

  2. 2
    Walt says:

    Faerie Balls are what the Faeries have
    Wolfmen have their own parties.
    Yes.
    Haerie Balls

  3. 3

    Um, were the Ellora’s Cavemen REALLY marching and posing to “God Bless the USA” at some point, or am I being too literal in my interpretation?  Because I need to know, so I’ll know if my head is going to explode.  Right now it’s in sort of a Schrodinger’s Cat state of indeterminate explodedness.

  4. 4

    Susan, you’re not being too literal in your interpretation. In an earlier post Sarah described the marching and posing in more detail:

    Then, there was a show. Or a skit. Or something. Picture a throbbing sound system playing Lee Greenwood’s “God Bless the USA” while the individual Ellora men lip-synched a verse. No, really. Picture that in your mind. Now add 1000 lbs. of OMGWTFBBQ and you will have an approximation of the expression on my face. Beefcake with added patriotism! Cover models who were proud to be an Americans! I was not aware there was a Yay USA Track here but apparently so.

    So first there was a guy in a construction vest, then a dude in dress whites who pulled off the military posture marvelously well… and then another gentleman in dress blues that were at least three sizes too big for him. Major demerits. And each time a new costumed man appears on stage, they lip sync another verse of the song, and salute, and pose, and more flexing, and the crowd goes wild. Seriously – I was absolutely sure I’d stumbled into a strange universe where there was not a single soul who could taste the absurd floating on the air. It was one of those moments that I suspect I’ll have more of: this is clearly for fans of romance, but I am not among the group who “gets it.”

  5. 5
    Natalie says:

    I’m about 99% sure that the person in the pink and purple body stocking with wings on Page 4 of the gallery is Kim Harrison.

  6. 6
    DS says:

    Were those balloons above Nora Robert’s head in the photograph of a photograph supposed to remind me of the breasts on the statue of Diana of Ephesus?

  7. 7
    Nora Roberts says:

    Cruel, cruel, Sarah to publish my perm from hell circa 1985.

    Yes, look at the balloons like DS. It’s all about the balloons . . . You only see balloons. Big, breasty balloons.

  8. 8

    I don’t know about you, but I never realized that RT featured hot half naked men. I think I found another reason to love literature.

  9. 9

    Then, there was a show. Or a skit. Or something. Picture a throbbing sound system playing Lee Greenwood’s “God Bless the USA” while the individual Ellora men lip-synched a verse. No, really. Picture that in your mind.

    Oh, dear.  The things I missed by having so crazy a week that I barely looked at any blogs.

  10. 10
    Tamar Bihari says:

    OMG, those pictures!  And here I thought SF/F fans hogged all the over the top crazy convention madness!  Apparently I was wrong.  Dead wrong.  I would have been giggling all weekend.

    Sarah, thank you so much for your missives from the con, from the sublime to the absurd (and the sublimely absurd).  Great to read.  Will you do the same at (the presumably much more staid) RWA National?

  11. 11
    Arethusa says:

    The still life was my favourite I think. Lord, some of those EC men had muscles the size of my head! And that pirate you wanted to take home? Totally had a beaver on his head.

  12. 12
    Esri Rose says:

    Sarah, you’re a champ to take and post all of these. I feel like I’m there, only without the hangover and the oily marks on my clothes.

    “Big, breasty balloons”… (snort)

  13. 13
    RfP says:

    Um, were the Ellora’s Cavemen REALLY marching and posing to “God Bless the USA” at some point, or am I being too literal in my interpretation?

    Susan, here’s another description.  Apparently it was Kathryn Falk’s idea of a 9/11 tribute.  It’s hard to comprehend, but that’s the story.

  14. 14
    RfP says:

    Oops, looks like that description originally came from here.

  15. 15
    Robin says:

    Apparently it was Kathryn Falk’s idea of a 9/11 tribute.  It’s hard to comprehend, but that’s the story.

    I think there’s a fine line between having a great sense of humor about yourself and becoming the butt of your own joke.  It sounds like that line saw a lot of action.

  16. 16
    RfP says:

    Robin, I’m confused.  Who had the humor and became the butt?  I feel like there’s a reference I’m not getting.

    I was reading the story more in the vein of trying to understand what RT’s about and why they held such a stage show, and whether it was a WTF moment on the scale of the 2005 RWA awards ceremony or just a rather wild party.

    Do you mean that in a broader view, romance fans at RT (and RT itself) have a sense of humor about themselves, but also get laughed at?  I think that’s often true when people are unabashed fans.  Enthusiasm is a more vulnerable posture than cynicism.  I’m all for having an unself-consciously good time, but that can definitely tread the line.

  17. 17
    Robin says:

    Do you mean that in a broader view, romance fans at RT (and RT itself) have a sense of humor about themselves, but also get laughed at?  I think that’s often true when people are unabashed fans.  Enthusiasm is a more vulnerable posture than cynicism.  I’m all for having an unself-consciously good time, but that can definitely tread the line.

    I was referring specifically to JC Wilder’s rendition of the show, and how the events she recounts seem to me either a good example of being able to laugh at oneself and have, as you say, an unselfconsciously good time, or as an example of becoming a caricature of oneself (or in this case, of the perception of Romance that mainstream folks often use against the genre and its authors and readers).  Depending on one’s perspective, I think the events portrayed in Wilder’s account could be seen in either light.  Honestly, it’s difficult for me to imagine an acceptable context for cover models groping women, but I imagine that many of the RT events most definitely have a very different character when one is participating in them than they do to the observer.

  18. 18
    SonomaLass says:

    Nora honey, we’ve ALL got “bad hair years” we’d like everyone to forget.  Just makes you seem more human, and we love that about you.

    About some events, you hear people say, “you had to be there.”  Thanks to SB Sarah, I don’t feel that this is one of them—we got the highlights, as it were, without standing in the buffet line.  Thanks, Sarah!  You can has tiara now.

  19. 19
    RfP says:

    OK, I thought that might be your angle, and I agree.

    However, as I’m sure you’ve thought about, the line is asymmetric: on one side are fans who can laugh at themselves, and on the other is “romance” becoming the butt of the joke.  It’s easy for an outsider to be disgusted—not by the fans as a few wacky people but by the conference itself, or the host of the event, or the genre.  (It’s not just in romance; it’s just the way we generalize about groups and tastes.)

    Have you ever seen the documentary film “Trekkies”?  I thought it did quite well at portraying both sides—the mockable moments and the nice people having a good time.

  20. 20
    Robin says:

    It’s easy for an outsider to be disgusted—not by the fans as a few wacky people but by the conference itself, or the host of the event, or the genre.  (It’s not just in romance; it’s just the way we generalize about groups and tastes.)

    I don’t think it’s just outsiders, RfP.  I have a fundamental ambivalence myself.  Part of me admires the ability of these folks to just have fun in the way they want and not care what anyone thinks—to embrace it all and celebrate.  But another part of me feels so completely alienated from that image of the genre and the fact that it’s being transmitted as the stereotype write live. 

    And yeah, I enjoyed Trekkies, and one thing that always interests me is the way in SF/F you often see fans costumed and role playing, but rarely the authors.  Which, I wonder, might be why they’re taken a wee bit more seriously in the maintream.

  21. 21
    Arethusa says:

    It was a 9/11 tribute? Sold! Where are the tickets to the next convention? (Wishful thinking on my part, really. This happened right around exam time. :/)

  22. 22
    Arethusa says:

    …on the other hand, why was there a 9/11 tribute? Not that one is restricted to only doing those in September it just…seems odd? (Why am I trying to figure this out? Just stare at the fairies and muscles. Stare at the fairies and muscles.)

    Captcha: care82. Yes, yes, I do care!

    Shit. I totally forgot I could edit my comments now instead of double commenting.

  23. 23
    Arethusa says:

    Yet, I fear I must abuse my commenting privileges to declare that after reading J.C. Wilder’s post I must rescind my previous enthusiasm. I had innocent images in my mind of men wiggling their hips to YMCA (or whatever   gyrating music is appropriate for a 9/11 tribute…?) but apparently it was…rowdier. Yes, rowdier and I’ve quickly changed my mind. Love you RT!

  24. 24
    RfP says:

    I don’t think it’s just outsiders

    Actually I considered deleting that word because I have a similar ambivalence.  But my discomfort isn’t all that strong about conferences and costumes; I’m more focused on writing, covers, and reviews.  Some people get together to do the Electric Bugaloo and some to do continuing education on plagiarism.  And some people do both, as happened at RT.

    Even with the books themselves, as long as “that image of the genre” is false, I get annoyed about covers but not usually TOO bothered.  I get queasiest when I feel the genre’s negative image has too much truth to it.

    in SF/F you often see fans costumed and role playing, but rarely the authors

    Trekkies probably wasn’t a great example, because I think a lot of the fan culture is focused the actors rather than the authors.  But yes, to some extent professionalism must be seen to be done.

    However, I get the feeling that RT’s effect on Romance’s image may be strongest within the community—e.g. here, in our reactions to SB Sarah’s reactions.  The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette’s reportage on RT focused first on its business significance and secondly on its tradition of costume balls—and not at all in a negative way.  Reading this article, my impression would be of a standard conference with economic significance and a dollop of extra fun.

  25. 25
    Susie says:

    Love. It. Thanks for sharing.  I’m not going to repeat my comment from RT Day 1 report, but I appreciate this in all it’s RT PR glory and urge others to fear the pirates, fringe, etc.

  26. 26
    Debby says:

    Loved your photos!  Mine are so much tamer in comparison.  Missed the EC event, and the Faery thing…but stopped in for part of the Vampire Ball after a private get-together with friends from another blog.  First thought and comment from me?  Where do they find the magic mirrors that tell them they look damn hot?  LOL!

  27. 27
    Susie says:

    Thanks to comment follow up email I see I forgot the word “not” in my above comment whih chanes my meaning entirely.  I meant to say, “…urge others not to fear…”
    I should have my commenting priv’s taken away!  I can not be trusted to comment in a clear manner!  Sorry. :(

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