Cassie Edwards V: But Wait, There’s More.

Part of a series: Cassie Edwards 1: The First Post | Cassie Edwards 2: Savage Longings | Cassie Edwards Part 3: Running Fox | Cassie Edwards Part 4: Savage Moon | Cassie Edwards Part 5: Savage Beloved | Follow-up: Penguin (Part 1?) | Official Statement from Signet | AP Article Contains Response from Edwards  | RWA Responds to Allegations  | A centralized document for the Cassie Edwards situation


Nikki the Super Badass Researcher contacted me yesterday upon realizing that she had a Cassie Edwards in her possession, and she had access to Google, and she had an hour to spare:

I must admit, it was worse than I feared.  My “evidence” file grew to six—6!—pages in Word.  The worst part?  I have an unsettling feeling that these are not the only questionable sections—simply the only ones I could locate via Google.  There’s one passage in particular about the male sage grouse’s mating ritual, of all things, that’s extremely suspect.

One last thing, which I thought was deliciously ironic.  The heroine’s name in this book is Candy.

I just made a noise I cannot transcribe accurately, but it was somewhere between a choke and a snort. 

Now for the Official Findings.

There were three texts heavily, shall we say, “borrowed” from:

THE MYTHOLOGY OF THE WICHITA by George Amos Dorsey, published in 1904
Available at Google Books
Available in its original form at Archive.org.

CADDOAN TEXTS PAWNEE, SOUTH BAND DIALECT by Gene Weltfish, published in 1937
Available at Google Books

INDIAN BOYHOOD by Charles Alexander Eastman, published in 1902
Available at Google Books.
Available in its original form at Archive.org.

I had to get a bit tricksy when searching CADDOAN TEXTS because it’s only available for viewing snippets via Google—not full text.  Luckily, the search function provided enough phrasing to recreate the relevant passages although attempting to verify the scans of the actual words wasn’t possible due to the limited view restriction.  I’m confident the search function is accurate, however, and no weirdness thanks to OCR occurred in those sections.

Examples positively identified are pasted below along with their corresponding counterparts in the source material.  There are several damning sections, the lengthiest one located on pages 213-214 (yes, it spans two pages) and covers nearly four paragraphs.

I’ve placed the Oddly Similar sections in bold so I hope it carries over to your email programs.  Also, I’m pretty sure I caught all my typos but I may have missed one or two.  If so, apologies but Y’ALL!  My fingers are tired.

.

Here’s the side by side that Nikki found and emailed us. Big hat tip and curtsey to Nikki, because this is above and beyond. In many, many ways.

SAVAGE BELOVED
Published by Leisure Books, May 2006
ISBN: 0843952733
Page 84

“There is an ancient legend telling that when the plants fail to come up, the Wichita people will cease to exist.”
[…]
“When the first shoot of corn comes up, an old woman goes there to perform a rite of thanksgiving over the plant,” he said.  “She rubs the plant with her hands in blessing, saying, ‘Oh, big bow,’ which means corn stalk.  Then she rubs a baby with her hands in a similar fashion, passing on the blessing from the plant to the child.”

He paused, smiled at Candy, then said, “Everyone is happy at the sight of the first plant.”

CADDOAN TEXTS PAWNEE, SOUTH BAND DIALECT by Gene Weltfish
Page 39

When the first shoot comes up an old woman goes there to perform a rite of thanksgiving over the plant.  She rubs the plant with her hands in blessing, saying, “Oh, big bow.”  Then directly she rubs the baby with her hands in a similar manner, passing on the blessing from the plant to the child.  Everyone is happy at the sight of the first plant.  There is an ancient legend that states that when the plants fail to come up, we will all cease to exist.


SAVAGE BELOVED
Page 122

At one side she saw a bed with a mattress made of slender willow rods and coverings of buffalo hide.
Hanging down in front of the bed was a long curtain of buffalo hide, which she could tell could be raised or lowered at will.  The half-lowered hide seemed to be painted with war scenes.

THE MYTHOLOGY OF THE WICHITA by George Amos Dorsey
Page 5

The beds consist of mattresses made of slender willow rods and coverings of buffalo hide.  Over the bed and hanging down in front, is a long curtain of buffalo hide, which can be raised or lowered at will; this is often painted with war scenes.


SAVAGE BELOVED
Page 172

“The tattoo on my right arm, that mark in the form of a small cross, is a symbol of the stars and represents a well-known mythical hero among the Wichita.  He is called Flint-Stone-Lying-Down-Above, which in my language is spoken as Tahanetsicihadidia, the guardian of the warriors.

THE MYTHOLOGY OF THE WICHITA by George Amos Dorsey
Page 2

On the back of each hand is tattooed a small design resembling the bird’s foot.  This is made immediately after the boy has killed his first bird.  Up and down the arms and across the breast may be found additional marks in the form of a small cross. […] These crosses are symbols of the stars and represent a well-known mythical hero among the Wichita called “Flint-Stone-Lying-Down-Above” (Tahanetskihadidia), who, as is told in one of the myths, is one of the guardians of the warriors.


SAVAGE BELOVED
Page 175

“Three concentric circles are tattooed around one nipple of each Wichita woman.  These concentric rings prevent the women’s breasts from becoming pendulous in old age.”

THE MYTHOLOGY OF THE WICHITA by George Amos Dorsey
Page 3

The nipple is also tattooed, and around it are three concentric circles. […]  They are also told that the concentric rings about the breasts prevent them from becoming pendulous in old age.


SAVAGE BELOVED
Page 179

“For it is now the Moon of the Strawberries, when bears are seeking green sedges, or roots, anthills, and berries, and when buffalo sharpen and polish their horns for bloody contests among themselves.”

INDIAN BOYHOOD by Dr. Charles Alexander Eastman
Page 54

“I was once an interested and unseen spectator of a contest between a pair of grizzly bears and three buffaloes—a rash act for the bears, for it was in the moon of strawberries, when the buffaloes sharpen and polish their horns for bloody contests among themselves.”


SAVAGE BELOVED by Cassie Edwards
Page 180

“Four of them represent the four world quarters, or gods, while the upward peak is symbolic of Man-Never-Known-On-Earth, or Kinnekasus, the Creator.”

He gestured toward the entranceway.  “And the door of all homes of my people is placed on the east side so that the sun may look into the lodge as it rises, while the small circular opening overhead is placed there not only for smoke to escape through, but also so that the sun may look into the lodge at noon, and at night, the star gods are thought to pour down their strength into our homes.”

He then gestured toward the fire pit.  “The fire’s place in all my people’s lodges is considered sacred,” he said.  “There offerings are made, food is cooked, and medicine is heated.”

THE MYTHOLOGY OF THE WICHITA by George Amos Dorsey
Page 5

The four projecting poles outside stand for the four world quarters or gods, while the upward peak is symbolic of Man-Never-Known-on-Earth (Kinnekasus), the Creator in Wichita mythology.  It is said that a door is placed on the east side that the sun may look into the lodge as it rises, and that the west door is so placed that the sun may look in as it sets, while through the small circular opening overhead the sun may look in at noon.  The south door is still retained that the god of the south wind may enter.  The fireplace is considered sacred, for here offerings are made, the food is cooked, medicines heated, etc.


SAVAGE BELOVED
Page 213-214

Each was emptying her bag, dumping the corn into one big heap.  The pile soon became so high that it looked as if wagons had been used to haul it instead of the simple carrying bags.
“The next step is to build a long, narrow ditch with mud embankments along each side against which to lean the corn,” Two Eagles explained.
[…]
“They will build a big fire and throw the ears into it,” Two Eagles said.  “The women will take turns reaching their hands in and out of the flames to turn the ears over.  They are skilled at doing this, and no one ever burns herself.  When the wood burns down, the naked ears are left to roast in the coals.  Sometimes the ears roast all night, as this gives them a delicious flavor, but today the women will just leave the corn in until the sun begins lowering in the sky.  Then whatever husks remain on the corn will be removed and the women will proceed to cut the kernels from the cobs.  For this purpose they will use a clam shell, but kernels from small-grained ears are removed with a knife.”
[…]
Candy saw some of the women spreading large hide covers over the ground, then pegging them down tight until they were smooth.
[…]
“The kernels of the roasted corn will be spread out there,” he said.  “The blue corn will be separated into three groups by size, small medium, and large.  Then they will be winnowed and put into sacks made of tanned hide.  After each sack is full, the women will beat upon it with a long stick to make sure that the grains are settled compactly into the bag.  They will place a lid inside the bag and pull the drawstring closed.  After all the bags are filled, there will be a big pile of them.”


CADDOAN TEXTS PAWNEE, SOUTH BAND DIALECT by Gene Weltfish
Page 40

Then they would dump them into one big heap.  The pile would be so high that it looked as if wagons had been used to do the hauling instead of the simple carrying bags.  The next step was to build a long narrow ditch with mud embankments along each side against which to lean the corn.

Then they would build a big fire and throw the ears of corn into it. One would have to stick one’s hand in and out of the flame repeatedly to turn the ears over, but one would never burn oneself.  When the wood has burned down the naked ears are roasted in the coals.  The corn would be left to roast all night as this gives it a delicious flavor.

Kernels from small-grained ears were removed with a knife. Large hide covers were then spread out upon the ground and pegged down tight so that they would be very smooth and upon these the kernels were spread out to dry.

When the kernels were dry they were winnowed and put into sacks made of tanned hide.  After each sack was full they would beat upon it with a long stick to make sure the grains settled compactly into the bag.  Then they would place a lid inside the bag […] pull the drawstring.  After we had filled them there would be a big pile of bags.


SAVAGE BELOVED
Page 220

Still in their pods, the beans had been spread out upon a hide pegged to the ground.  When the beans had dried, they were beaten with a stick to release them from the pods.  Finally the beans were winnowed and then packed in bags.
[…]
The first step was to peel the pumpkins.  Then some were cut spirally into strips from top to bottom, while others were cut into rings and hung on a cross-pole to dry.

After the whole pumpkin had been stripped, there was a disc left at the bottom, which was known as the “Sitting One.”  The pumpkin pieces were then left to dry for about a day.  Afterward, the women gathered again to complete the process.  The pumpkin strips were braided and formed into mats, which were left out in the sun to dry.

CADDOAN TEXTS PAWNEE, SOUTH BAND DIALECT by Gene Weltfish
Pages 40-41

The beans in their pods would be spread out upon a hide which was pegged to the ground and when they were dry would be beaten with a stick to release them from the pods.
[…]
The first step was to peel the pumpkins. Then if it is decided that braided pumpkin mats are to be made, the pumpkins are cut spirally into strips from top to bottom. Other pumpkins are cut into rings and hung on a cross pole to dry. After the whole pumpkin has been stripped there is left a disc at the bottom which is known as “Sitting-one.”  The pumpkin is then left to dry for about a day when it is in the proper stage for braiding and for the stringing of the bottom discs.  After they are braided, the pumpkin mats are left out in the sun to dry.


SAVAGE BELOVED
Page 231

“The moon is the special guardian of Wichita women, for the moon is a woman and possesses all the powers that women desire.  It was the moon taught the first woman on earth and gave her power.  She instructs women as to the time of the monthly sickness, informs them when they are pregnant, and when the child is to be born.  She has told them that after birth the child must be offered to her by passing the hands over the child’s body and raising it aloft to the moon.  At that time the moon is asked to bestow her blessings upon the child, that he or she may grow into power rapidly, for she, herself, has the power to increase rapidly in size.”

MYTHOLOGY OF THE WICHITA by George Amos Dorsey
Page 19

The Moon is the special guardian of the women, for she is a woman and possesses all the powers which women desire. She it was who taught the first woman on earth and gave her power. She instructs the women as to the time of the monthly sickness, informs them when they are pregnant, and when the child is to be born, and has told them that after birth the child must be offered to her by passing the hands over the child’s body and raising it aloft, offering it to the Moon, at which time she is asked to bestow her blessing upon the child, that he may grow into power rapidly, for she herself has the power to increase rapidly in size.


SAVAGE BELOVED by Cassie Edwards
Page 340

“That star in the north is known as the ‘Ghost-Bear,’” Two Eagles said.  “It is said that a man who was traveling in the far north came upon another man who said, ‘This is my burial place.  I live in the far north.  If you accept whatever I offer you, I will give you power.  You shall have power over the herbs to cure people, for I am a medicine man.  If an accident should happen, or if sickness should arrive, I will give you a way to heal.  In your doctoring you should look to the sun, for my powers are derived from him.  Before you begin doctoring, offer me smoke.’ The man was then informed that it was the Ghost Bear who was talking to him, and upon looking again, he saw that it was a Ghost Bear.  The man looked back and the Ghost Bear had become a star.”

MYTHOLOGY OF THE WICHITA by George Amos Dorsey
Page 18

Next in importance is a star in the north known as the “Ghost-Bear.” This star is of comparatively recent origin, for it is said that a certain man who traveled in the far north saw a human being standing before him, who said to him: “This is my burial place. I live in the far north. There I live. Should you like some of my power, and should you accept whatever I offer you I will give you power. You shall have the power over the herbs to cure people, for I am a medicine-man. If an accident should happen, or if sickness should arise, I will give you a way to heal, and in your doctoring you should look to the Sun, for my powers are derived from him. Before you begin doctoring, offer me smoke.” Thereupon the man was informed that it was the Ghost-Bear who was talking to him, and upon looking again he saw that it was a Ghost-Bear. The man looked back and the Ghost-Bear had become a star.

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  1. 1
    Jen says:

    Good lord.  I will be very upset if something isn’t done about this by the publishing industry.  Part of me wants Edwards to be publicly humiliated, but I’m worried non-romance readers will mistake her for the rest of the romance world. 

    And that would be a damn shame.

  2. 2
    monimala says:

    Just when I thought my jaw couldn’t drop any further, it has unhinged to the point where I could swallow a water buffalo.

    Pitchfork?  Check.  Torch?  Check.  Utter disappointment at Ms. Edwards for more than just the horrible depiction of Native Americans?  Check.

  3. 3

    I agree with Jen. I can almost see this going “Oh they ALL must do this then”. This is a shame, but I’m willing to bet on works as old as the ones she “borrowed” from, more than she has done it.

  4. 4
    Kimberly Anne says:

    Dear heaven, more?  Although the theft of even one piece of work is reprehensible, this is off the charts.  How much more monstrous can this get?

    I want to ask how no one caught this before, but these are obscure and unknown texts for your average reader.  I’ve certainly never heard of any of them (that may just mean I’m a slouch, though)!

    Yes, Karen and Candy and Nikki found them with very little initial digging, but how many people are actually going to do that digging?  Most people will just roll their eyes and think, “sucky book, bad writing,” and move on.  They’re not going to question the integrity of the author based on wildly uneven style.  Hell, if they’re anything like me, the blocks of expository text just get skipped over.

    This is just a long-winded way of saying, “Way to go, Bitches,” for uncovering this and not being afraid to speak out.  Hopefully all romance doesn’t get tarred with this nasty brush.

  5. 5
    Jane says:

    Maybe we need to have homework assignments and every reader can take a book until all 100 have been assigned and investigated.

  6. 6
    Emt says:

    I think your concern is missplaced, Jen. There are plenty of examples of authors plagarising that have not backlashed on to the respective genre. For example: J.K. Rowlings was accused of plagrism, but it had no effect on childrens books as a whole. Like wise James Brown faced several lawsuits but religious fictions is a strong as ever.

  7. 7
    JaneyD says:

    Has any of this been sent to Publisher’s Weekly?  Seems it would make for an interesting story.

  8. 8
    Teddy Pig says:

    As an enraged SB fan I find this lacking in gleeful delight. Needs more cow bell!

  9. 9
    Sandra D says:

    The sheer magnitude of this astounds and disgusts me. I honestly don’t know if I’ve read any of her work or not but I still feel ripped off as a reader. And another thing, if she’s done so much research and is even quoting it pretty much word for word, how come she still manages to portray Native Americans so very badly?

  10. 10
    Abney says:

    I think the problem is that the people (in the many examples cited) doing this “copying” have probably rationalized that it isn’t plagiarism.

    What lead me to this thinking is I was in an off-line discussion with a friend and she said that she thought plagiarizing only occurred when you copied word for word. Yeah she is a college educated professional, before anyone asks.

    I think that part of the problem is our culture has adopted an “it’s okay if you just put it in your own words” mentality. Which I think stems from a contemporary fluidity with what words mean. But that is another rant.

    My point is we just don’t see plagerism as really stealing really. Just kinda borrowing stuff that doesn’t matter.

    That is the ONLY explanation my mind could come up with to some of the responses defending CE. That what she did was only sorta of plagiarizing and the folks who had the bad taste to mention it were only doing so to be mean.

    So she should get a pass because her feelings got hurt… whatever dude.

    One of the interesting points that came up during my off-line conversation was the fact that we couldn’t recall ever seeing a bibliography or sources cited in other historicals, with the exception of some mention in forward or acknowledgements.

    But the truth is that I usually don’t pay attention and maybe that is what those who engage in this behavior are thinking or counting on.

    That no one is going to notice.~A

  11. 11
    Rosemary says:

    All I can think of is that this whole thing wouldn’t have been an issue if she would have just CITED HER DAMN SOURCES.

    Jesus, people.  How hard can it be?  I’ve written more than my fair share of papers in my lifetime, and they all had a fucking ‘BIBLIOGRAPY’ page or 5 at the end.  Why can’t fiction authors do that?  IS IT THAT DAMN HARD?  I’m not even picky.  You can use your preferred format.  MLA, APA, whatever.

    Ugh.  C’mon.

  12. 12
    Gwen says:

    Couple of thoughts today on this topic…

    Wonder when Edwards originally published some of these works and if any of them predated the academic tomes. (Probably not, but would be interesting to state.)

    and

    I found a mention of someone else plagiarizing Edwards on a discussion forum talking about, of all things, Sasquatch (http://www.bigfootforums.com/index.php?showtopic=21116&st=350), post #356:  “…When I embarked on finding the source of Jan Carter’s “dictionary” of Sasquatch words, and I found Rides the Wind, I thought I’d found the single source in a plagiarized fashion. But I also found a phrase in a Cassie Edwards book called Savage Fire. Being the owner of several Edwards books, and one new one, I decided to start reading them over again. They’re good books so that was not a challenge for me. I started with the newest acquisition, and sure enough, page after page was revealed to me with definitions written phonetically as with Rides the Wind. This book was first published in 1986. One particular definition stood out. It was spelled identically to Cassie’s definition. Jan’s definition was translated to mean, “True Friends, that is what you two have proven to be.” Cassie Edwards, who spent many months researching languages as a true author should, defined the exact same sentence as “Partners in Crime, that is what you two have proven to be.”…”

    Interesting, no?

  13. 13
    Sara says:

    I’ll admit that I would dearly love to know what kinds of conversations are happening at the Cassie Edwards Fan Club message boards: http://cassieedwardsfanclub.homestead.com/InfoPage.html

    Alas, there’s a $13 registration fee, and my cheapness outweighs my curiosity.

  14. 14

    I’m no expert on citation, but I’m not sure a bibliography would’ve been enough here. Wouldn’t the copied (exactly) text have to be in quotes or italices?

  15. 15
    Sara says:

    Agreed, Victoria. She needed to cite her sources and reword the information into her own words. Lifting verbatim or almost verbatim without quotes and attribution is a no-no.

  16. 16
    quizzabella says:

    Wow.  Sweet baby Jesus and the orphans, has the copy/paste mouse click ever been so abused before?  I don’t have feelings for Cassie Edwards one way or the other, but it’s sad that as Jen pointed out (look! credited another person’s work CE – watch and learn), that this will reflect badly on the romance genre as a whole.  There are so many writers out there who actually take the time to research their work properly.

  17. 17
    Gwen says:

    I don’t think this will reflect negatively on the romance genre any more than the Janet Dailey/Nora Roberts incident did. 

    I wasn’t reading romance then, but I think Dailey-gate only bothered romance fans.  I don’t recall that it meant a lot to me and my fellow murder mystery and thriller fans.  A small blip on the literary radar, fortunately (or unfortunately, depending on how you look at it).

    Well.  It probably bothered Dailey’s publisher.  I imagine her sales took a hit since romance is such a fan purchase-driven genre.

    What occurs over the next few weeks/months should be interesting.  I wonder what the publishers/authors of the academic texts are doing right now…

  18. 18

    A word or two on citing sources:  Not all publishers of romance novels wish for authors to list extensive bibliographies or cite sources in the manuscript.  It is, after all, a novel.  I always try to include an author’s note regarding the historical accuracy of particular characters or scenes, or clarifying that while my book’s set in Florida, my setting of “Key Marquez” is a fictional amalgamation of a couple of real Florida sites.

    And I always encourage readers to contact me if they want to know my sources.  It’s fun to share, especially when you’re a history wonk.[g]

  19. 19
    Sphinx says:

    For benefit of the Cassie Edwards apologists who may still be reading, and to wave some heat off the beloved Bitches and onto myself: my mood toward this discovery is pure naked glee unalloyed by pity or sympathy.  This woman writes horrible books and portrays Native Americans in horrible ways—even if there were no Native Americans in her novels and she was writing about the Revolutionary War, they would still have plots made of sand and characters made of wood—and the fact that she clearly has the resource material sitting right there only serves to make her novels even more inexcusable.  And why yes, Cassie Edwards did run over my dog.

    (My confirmation word: red42.  As in red-handed.  As in how Cassie Edwards has been found.  The only person I’d rather see this happen to is Laurell K. Hamilton.)

  20. 20
    Kaite says:

    I’d give her the benefit of the doubt and say maybe she misinterpreted the whole “Plaguerism, what is it really?” thing, but sweet baby Jesus, her stuff is crap. The quotes you present are so stiff and unnatural in delivery, I cringe trying to imagine real people saying stuff like that.

    Nope, not working. I can’t imagine humans speaking like that, even if they are uptight, rather pedantic Native American history professors with sticks up their arse.

  21. 21
    Jenny says:

    <

    >

    I’m confused. 

    Maybe I’m just a product of this culture, but if you turn to source material for research, read it, incorporate it into your mental knowledge base, and then rewrite that information in your book in your own – or, more accurately, the character’s – words, how is that wrong?  It would be like saying you can know the stuff but could never use it.

    As to the lack bibliographies, part of that may lie with the publishers.  Even authors who produce a list of their source material may not be allowed to include it.  IIRC, Diana Gabaldon has said she was discouraged from including a bibliography with “Outlander” and her unease with that lack eventually led – after her great sucess and therefore increased clout – to the publication of the non-fic “Outlandish Companion”.

    Note: I am *not* defending CE here, because obviously what she’s done goes beyond all questions of is-it-or-isn’t-it-plagiarism and propriety, and I think action should be taken.

    But as an aspiring author in the throes of my own reasearch, I’m trying to understand what good it will do me if I’m not even allowed to state the information “in my own words.”

  22. 22
    Mel-O-Drama says:

    I am glad I have never read a CE books because it looks like she has never written one… sorry, couldn’t help myself.

  23. 23

    Didja hear that Missy Chase Lapine filed a lawsuit against the Seinfeld’s (both!) for (vegetarian) plagiarism and character defamation?

    Good for her! I bought her book on principle (and by the way, my son loves the food I’ve made from it so if you can’t get your kid to eat veggies, it’s a worthy investment!).

    Anyway, if you own a CE book maybe you should petition the publisher for a refund.

  24. 24
    Dragonette says:

    Sara: 

    $13 to register for her message boards?  srsly?  i guess i’m sheltered; i’ve never been asked to pay to post before.  register, yes; pay, no.

  25. 25
    Karla says:

    I think the most interesting thing about this is how old her apparent source books are.  I have to wonder why she wouldn’t have used something a little more current for her information on Native Americans given that we know a lot of the earlier work was not as accurate as it could have been.

  26. 26
    Sara says:

    $13 to register for her message boards?  srsly?  i guess i’m sheltered; i’ve never been asked to pay to post before.  register, yes; pay, no.

    Actually, the $13 is an annual membership fee to join her fan club, which boasts a host of benefits, one of which is the message board on the fan club website.

  27. 27
    Sphinx says:

    To Ms. Marshall: I for one adore it when the author of a book has read some of the same resource material I have!  Pamela Kaufman appears to have read a great number of familiar sources for her Alix of Wanthwaite series, and, more recently, I recognised a lot of sources in Water for Elephants.

  28. 28
    Anna says:

    Maybe I’m just a product of this culture, but if you turn to source material for research, read it, incorporate it into your mental knowledge base, and then rewrite that information in your book in your own – or, more accurately, the character’s – words, how is that wrong?  It would be like saying you can know the stuff but could never use it.

    Jenny, there’s a difference between incorporating information you’ve gathered and simply rewording that information.  Technically – technically – one could argue that Ms. Edwards has several passages here which could be considered her own words because they’re not precise copies of the original.  But it’s still plagiarism because the passages are so similar in structure and wording and whatnot, with no credit given or indication that she drafted those passages from scratch.

    Not being Abney I can’t speak for her in the passage you quoted, but there’s a huge difference between using the information and using the text.  This is a clear example of using the text.

  29. 29
    Nonnie says:

    Jenny, I think in this instance it is clear to see that CE didn’t use her own words. 

    What I remember from when the nuns were smacking my classmates and me over the head with our English textbooks, you CAN reword it, but rewording doesn’t mean removing one or two words from the material.  It means reworking it to get the point across without using the same exact words. 

    I think (and that’s always a bad thing) that the passage on page 49 of Savage Longings could have read:

    The root digger was a thin pointed tool made from the wood of the ash tree that could be utilized in the extraction of ground roots.  A protective grip existed on one end while the tip was strengthened with the heat from the fire.

    If it had (rather than the way it was copied from The Cheyenne Indians, I don’t think we would have be having this conversation.

  30. 30
    Lyvvie says:

    I think Katie’s right, it’s Plaguerism. Certainly seems like a plague. (I’m not sure if that was a typo or deliberate, but I love it)

    I’m amazed at the level of eeriness. I’m impressed with the amount and speed of research and look forward to the ever unfolding of this story. Please let there be more unfolding!!

    Spamword: quality65

    Absolutely Top Quality!

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